The Fight for 15 campaign has made some major headway. The labor protest movement that fast-food workers in New York City began nearly three years ago has led to higher wages for workers all across the country.

A panel appointed by Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo recommended that the minimum wage be raised for employees of fast-food chain restaurants throughout the state to $15 an hour over the next few years. Wages would be raised faster in New York City than in the rest of the state to account for the higher cost of living there.

The panel’s recommendations, which are expected to be put into effect by an order of the state’s acting commissioner of labor, represent a major triumph for the advocates who have rallied burger-flippers and fry cooks to demand pay that covers their basic needs. They argued that taxpayers were subsidizing the workforces of some multinational corporations, like McDonald’s, that were not paying enough to keep their workers from relying on food stamps and other welfare benefits.

The $15 wage would represent a raise of more than 70 percent for workers earning the state’s current minimum wage of $8.75 an hour. Advocates for low-wage workers said they believed the mandate would quickly spur raises for employees in other industries across the state, and a jubilant Mr. Cuomo predicted that other states would follow his lead.

The decision comes on the heels of similar increases in minimum wages in other cities, including Los Angeles, San Francisco and Seattle. On Tuesday, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors agreed to raise the county’s minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2020, matching a move the Los Angeles City Council made in June.

The board said the first wage increase should come by Dec. 31, taking the minimum in the city to $10.50 and in the rest of the state to $9.75. The wage in the city would then rise in increments of $1.50 annually for the next three years, until it reaches $15 at the end of 2018. In the rest of the state, the hourly wage would rise each year, reaching $15 on July 1, 2021.

Economists predict the increases would ripple out to other restaurants and other industries that pay low wages in order to compete for workers. Unfortunately, Seattle has seen unexpected fallout. Some workers in Seattle are finding that the higher wage is forcing them off the welfare programs they would rather stay enrolled in and, instead of celebrating their higher income, they are imposing fewer work hours on themselves in order to stay on assistance.

Other changes include some restaurants tacking on a 15 percent surcharge onto customer’s bills in order to avoid firing workers. Other stores, restaurants, and small businesses are simply closing down because they can’t afford the wage hike. By March of this year, restaurant closings increased at a much higher than average rate in Seattle. Many restaurants noted that the new wage put labor costs at nearly 50 percent of operating costs, and that made profit margins disappear.

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